The Annual International Berkeley Undergraduate Prize for Architectural Design Excellence 2018
Berkeley Prize 2018

Berkeley Prize Committee

Benard Acellam

Benard Acellam

Benard Acellam a graduate teaching assistant in the department of Architecture at International University of East Africa in Kampalarecently.  He graduated with a B.Arch. degree from Makerere University in Uganda.

As a first year undergraduate student, Benard received the BERKELEY PRIZE Travel Fellowship in 2011 and participated in Global Studio Bhopal, India. Later in his final year, he was awarded 2nd place essay prize in the 2015 Berkeley Prize Competition. He is also a recipient of the INDIAFRICA Essay Prize, the UN-HABITAT Youth Social Media and Blogging award, a first Prize group award in the Tubes Architecture Challenge, and a commendation in the 2014 RIBA Norman Foster Travelling Scholarship competition. His enthusiasm for writing and research also saw him work as a volunteer creative writer for Rebuild Global, a San Diego based non-profit committed to building for a social purpose.

After graduation, he completed an internship in Uganda’s Ministry of Education Science, Technology and Sports, where he worked with a team of experts to propose designs for solid waste management systems for 4 National Teachers’ colleges on the Teacher Training Education project.  He also served as an intern architect at the Renzo Piano Building Workshop in Genoa, Italy.

Benard is interested in the role of architecture as a tool for social and economic transformation and aims to pursue these interests through research and application.

 

 

Elaine Addison

Elaine Addison

Elaine Addison is a writer, educator, mother and documentary film-maker -- today combines all these talents as an international childcare expert. Author of Miss Poppy's Guide to Raising Perfectly Happy Children and co-founder of FAMILY LIFE parenting magazine, she has over 20 years of experience in child education and care. From teaching underprivileged children in inner city schools to caring for those of world leaders and Hollywood stars, she is the modern day Mary Poppins. Interested in how architecture can aid childhood development, she has worked with children living in tents in Cambodia to those in project housing and European stately homes.

Andrew Amara

Andrew Amara

Andrew Amara, is an architect who has worked across the global on small and large projects:  first with DIMENSIONS, a regional architecture practice, then MODE (Missionaries of Design), a non-profit organization which runs several small community intervention projects; ranging from refurbishment of urban monuments to slum dwelling upgrade. As a mentor and project associate with Global Studio, Andrew worked with vulnerable communities in Vancouver and Johannesburg. In Preston UK, he supported communities in understanding neighbourhood planning. 

As a member of the Uganda Society of Architects, and he has served on several symposium committees, and editorial boards, spearheading a drive to raise public awareness on the role of architects in building sustainable environments. He has worked on documentary projects that capture the different experiences of living in Kampala, with the main aim of ''provoking'' city-building professionals to rethink the approach to building cities and settlements. 

In 2006 Andrew won the BERKELEY PRIZE Travel Fellowship and the third place in BERKELEY PRIZE Essay Competition and since 2007 has served on the BERKELEY PRIZE Committee. Andrew is also a recipient of the Mandela Washington Fellowship 2014, Ashoka’s Changemaker’s Finalist 2014, Allan Gilbert Scholar’s award 2013, Architecture for Humanity Founder’s Award 2011, the Arkright award for excellence at Makerere University, the REDDS award and a winner of the Uganda Ministry of Housing/Works Construction Exhibition Competition.  Andrew currently runs an architecture practice (STUDIO FLAME) and an urban development program (TOWN BUILD) in Uganda.

 

Christopher Ategeka

Christopher Ategeka

Chris is an engineer, inventor, and entrepreneur at heart. He is CEO and Founder of Rides for Lives which is a 501c3 non-profit organization. Motivated by his own experiences growing up in rural Uganda, Chris started Rides for Lives dedicated to building adaptive, cost efficient, mobility vehicles to bring healthcare access services and economic opportunity to isolated people in rural Africa.

Chris is the oldest of five children, became an Orphan after losing both his parents to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. He became the head of the household and caretaker of his siblings at an early age. Chris spent many years, in poverty in his native rural Uganda struggling and laboring in fields.  Through many life events, Chris ended up in engineering school in California. He holds a Bachelors of Science and a Masters of Science in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley and has taken a leave pursuing his PhD to concentrate on Rides for Lives

Chris has been awarded several distinctions and awards for his work at Rides for Lives most notably is UC Berkeley’s prestigious Judith Lee Stronach award which helped launch Rides for Lives. In addition, he got awarded U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AID Relief (PEPFAR) Award; African Forum 100 Innovations for sustainable development 2013 by the French government; UC Berkeley’s BigIdeas Award, gave a TED Talk in 2012 as well as got nominated as a TED Fellow. He got awarded UC Berkeley chancellors award for public service; Recipient of the chevron Award ; Speaker at the UC Berkeley college of Engineering graduation Ceremony May 2011. Most recently Chris got named Forbes 30under30 social Entrepreneurs in the world as well as nominated as 2014 CNN Hero. Chris’ work has been featured on major media networks BBC, CNN, CCTV Africa, Fast Company, NPR, KQED, UBCTV, on the cover of SF Chronicle, and VoiceAmerica (Impact Africa).

Sangeeta Bagga

Sangeeta Bagga

Sangeeta Bagga graduated from the Chandigarh College of Architecture, Chandigarh, INDIA in 1991, and went on to receive a postgraduate degree in Urban Design from the School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi.  She was awarded her PhD in Architecture, from the Panjab University, Chandigarh and is now faculty at the Chandigarh College of Architecture, Chandigarh where she teaches Urban Design, History of the Built Environment and Architectural Design Studio.  Her interests include documenting the change which Chandigarh is fast undergoing, the case studies of several of which have been presented at international conferences at home and abroad.  She is a member of the Heritage Committee, Chandigarh Administration, member INTACH, Chandigarh Chapter and Life Member; Indian Institute of Architects, Mumbai.

Erick Bernabe

Erick Bernabe

Erick Bernabe earned his Bachelor of Arts in Architecture from UC Berkeley, focusing on sustainability as a social imperative and how the built environment can be a mechanism for positive change and human solidarity. Since graduating in 2010, Erick has worked for practices that champion the architect as activist, firms include David Baker + Partners Architects, Sayler Design, and McCamant & Durrett Architects. Now as an architecture graduate student at the University of Oregon, he continues to put everything he has learned on the proverbial table and collaborate with people of varying experiences and of different disciplines. As a student of Professor Raymond Lifchez, Erick believes in the potential for community engagement and realized change generated from discussion of the social art of architecture.

Aleksis Bertoni

Aleksis Bertoni

Aleksis Bertoni is currently a Master of Architecture candidate at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design. At Harvard, he continues to pursue a line of design questioning he first developed at UC Berkeley, while pursuing his B.A. in Architecture. His work centers on the relationship between design problem-solving, social justice, and evolving fabrication technologies. Most recently he held a position as an artist in residence at Autodesk’s Pier 9 workshop, developing projects that utilized the potential of computer-controlled fabrication techniques in the service of low-cost furniture solutions.

Paul Broches

Paul Broches

Paul Broches, FAIA, has been a partner at Mitchell/Giurgola Architects in New York since 1980. He advises clients on evolving educational policies and facility programming and has led master planning efforts and designed buildings on many campuses. In 2003-2004 he was involved in a housing competition intending to address the common issue in cities of high density and low density affordable housing with a plan that encourages the diffusion and diminishing of social and ethnic stress in neighborhoods in transition. The scheme was premiated perhaps because it had both clear social objectives, fresh architectural presence (yet buildable) and the sustainable design that hinged on a "breathing" weather-mediating porch/winter-garden for each apartment. This caught the attention of developers as it was both rentable space and an energy saving source of heating and cooling. We are also heavily involved with the design of public schools in NYC in communities where the school house becomes THE 24/7 civic center, a public place and safety net for all.

Himanshu Burte

Himanshu Burte

Himanshu Burte has practiced architecture, and written extensively on the poetics and politics of the built environment since 1990. His book, Space for Engagement: The Indian Artplace and a Habitational Approach to Architecture (Seagull Books, Kolkata, 2008), proposes an alternative conceptual framework for architecture centred on the act of dwelling. A former Fulbright Fellow, heteaches at School of Habitat Studies, Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS), Mumbai. Research interests include politics of urban space, place, modernity, urban infrastructure, housing policy, theatre architecture and sustainable urbanism. He is co-writing a book on sustainable architecture in India with a grant from Graham Foundation, Chicago, and pursuing a PhD in urban planning from CEPT University, Ahmedabad. He is a member of the Editorial Advisory Panel of Marg Publications, Mumbai.

John Cary

John Cary

John Cary is editor of PublicInterestDesign.org, a new effort he has launched after recently stepping down after seven years as Executive Director of the non-profit organization, Public Architecture, in San Francisco.  A Fellow of the American Academy in Rome, John was a 2008 recipient of the Rome Prize fellowship in design.  He has also held the Public Affairs Practitioner Residency at the Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Center, and was among the inaugural class of fellows of the Aspen Institute's Ideas Festival.  . He is the author of The Power of Pro Bono: 40 Stories about Design for the Public Good by Architects and Their Clients (Metropolis Books / DAP, 2010).   A 2003 graduate of the UC Berkeley College of Environmental Design and its 2011commencement speaker, John has been a BERKELEY PRIZE committee member since 1999.

Ellen Chen

Ellen Chen

Ellen Chen is a design thinker whose peregrination has driven her to dip her fingers into all sorts of pies - devising an Urban Sustainability Index for Chinese cities with McKinsey & Co.,  facilitating participatory planning sessions on affordable housing finance in Delhi, documenting civic engagement & micro-development enterprises with the Malaysian Ministry of Education. Her research interests include megacity logistics, evaluating emerging technologies for the developing world, and private-sector led action strategies for cities. Ms. Chen graduated with a B.A. in Urban Studies from UC Berkeley and a Masters in City Planning from MIT.

Thea Chroman

Thea Chroman

Thea Chroman is the Assistant Director of the Program on Democratic Engagement and Governance at the University of Oregon's Wayne Morse Center for Law and Politics.  She works primarily with undergraduates who are interested in leadership, public service, and social change.  Thea curates programming that connects students with opportunities, helps provide a broad introduction to ideas around the meaning of democracy, supports their civic engagement, and assists in launching them into their post-college careers.  

Also a public radio producer, Thea’s reporting on education and urban planning in the San Francisco Bay Area garnered accolades including the Society of Professional Journalists Sigma Delta Chi award for Best Radio Documentary, the Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence (Region 11), and multiple Gracie Allen awards, among others.  As associate producer at KALW Public Radio in San Francisco, she was responsible for the daily news show script, wrote grants, and always won the holiday Pie-Off.

Thea was a Fulbright Berlin Capitals Fellow, and was a finalist for the NPR Kroc Fellowship.  She has a B.A in Sociology from Mills College and an M.S. in Media Studies from the University of Oregon. 

Thea is the administrator for the BERKELEY PRIZE.

Benjamin Clavan

Benjamin Clavan

Benjamin Clavan, Ph.D. is Principal of BENJAMIN CLAVAN, ARCHITECT, AIA, located in Los Angeles, U.S.A. and Valencia, Spain.  The residential and commercial projects of his firm have been showcased in design magazines and featured on television.  In different periods of his professional life he as also been active as an architectural journalist and his commentary has appeared in professional and popular publicatons. 

Dr. Clavan has previously been very involved in civic affairs, particularly as they intersect with urban design issues.  Over the years has served as an appointed Member of the West Hollywood Planning Commission, the West Hollywood Public Facilities Commission, and as an elected member of his Los Angeles neighborhood's Community Council and Chair of its Land Use Planning Committee.

Benjamin is one of the founding Members of the BERKELEY PRIZE Committee and is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the PRIZE, including guiding the look and editorial content of the PRIZE's website.  Over the past few years he has traveled extensively to attend conferences and deliver lectures on the topic of achieving people-centered architecture and the roll the BERKELEY PRIZE plays in furthering this goal. 

He holds a Ph.D. and a Masters in Architecture (University of California, Berkeley),a Bachelors in Architecture (University of Virginia), and was a non-degree student in the Diploma in Architecture program (University College London).

Roddy Creedon

Roddy Creedon

Roddy Creedon is a Lecturer in design at the University of California, Berkeley, where he is also actively involved with the Arcus Endowment, which supports a wide range of critical activities that explore the relationship between gender, sexuality and the built environment. He studied at Tulane University, the Architectural Association and Harvard, and is a principal of the award-winning firm Allied Architecture and Design.

Howard Davis

Howard Davis

Howard Davis is Professor of Architecture at the University of Oregon, where he teaches design studios, courses and seminars concerning the cultural and urban contexts of architecture. He was educated in physics at Cooper Union and Northwestern University, and in architecture at the University of California, Berkeley, where he subsequently worked and taught with Christopher Alexander and Ray Lifchez. He is the author of The Culture of Building and Living Over the Store: Architecture and Local Urban Life. His current work is concerned with how buildings and urban form can support grassroots economic activity for people at the bottom of the economic ladder, and is currently researching this topic in Portland, Oregon and in London, where he was recently Visiting Professor at the Bartlett School of Architecture. He was founding co-editor of Buildings & Landscapes: Journal of the Vernacular Architecture Forum and in 2009 was named Distinguished Professor of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture.

Charles Debbas

Charles Debbas

Charles Debbas established Debbas Architecture (Berkeley CA) in 1989, an award winning Architectural firm with projects spanning many countries and cultures. Rooted in minimalism his work takes inspiration in Japanese architecture, the words and works of Louis Kahn, Le Corbusier, Luis Baragan and Industrial Designer Luigi Colani. He is a strong advocate of social and environmental responsibility Architecture needs to bear, something too often ignored in its all consuming search and embrace of fame and trends. He sees Architecture as a sculpture for the sculpture of the soul, chiseled in our humanity, emotions, elusiveness, sensuality and permanent discovery. In addition to his devotion to his Architectural practice, Charles teaches Architecture at Stanford University. He is also engaged in product design and is fluent in English, French and Arabic.

Kim Dovey

Kim Dovey

Kim Dovey, Ph.D. is Professor of Architecture and Urban Design at the University of Melbourne.  He has published widely on theories of place and practices of placemaking in architecture and urban design, including the books Framing Places: Mediating Power in Built Form (Routledge, 2nd ed 2008), Fluid City (Routledge, 2005) and Becoming Places (Routledge 2009).  He was educated in architecture at Curtin University, the University of Melbourne, and the University of California, Berkeley.

Lynne Elizabeth

Lynne Elizabeth

Lynne Elizabeth is director of New Village Press, the publishing arm of Architects/Designers/Planners for Social Responsibility. She is also co-editor of Alternative Construction: Contemporary Natural Building Methods (John Wiley & Sons, 2000, 2005), Works of Heart: Building Village through the Arts (New Village Press, 2006), What We See: Advancing the Observations of Jane Jacobs (New Village Press, 2010), and Beyond Zuccotti Park: Freedom of Assembly and the Occupation of Public Space (New Village Press, 2012). Lynne is currently developing the Openhearted Cities Initiative for ADPSR.

Teddy Forscher

Teddy Forscher

Teddy is currently a graduate studying Civil Engineering at University of California, Berkeley.  He has a strong interest in architectural design, specifically in matters related to the personal dwelling and hopes eventually to fuse architecture and engineering professionally.  Alongside his technical studies, he has been a student in courses centered on the social art of architecture, as well as human interaction with the built environment, taught by Professor Raymond Lifchez (see below).  He finds traveling to be a firsthand way to supplement studying through immersion in other cultures, learning about their specific ways of life and how that translates into the built environment. His other interests include Japanese language and culture, photography, and baseball. 

Dorit Fromm

Dorit Fromm

Dorit Fromm is a researcher and consultant on innovative communities, design, and housing. Her background as an architect and communications director informs her writings, which have appeared in local, national and international publications including Urban Land, Metropolis, the Architectural Review, Communities Magazine, ArcCA, Baumeister, and AARP Journal. She is the author of Cohousing, Central Living and Other New Forms of Housing.

Thomas Gensheimer

Thomas Gensheimer

Thomas Gensheimer is a professor of architectural history at the Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, Georgia where he specializes in African and Islamic architecture and urbanism. He has published on globalization and the urban history of the East African coast.

Ann Gilkerson

Ann Gilkerson

An independent architectural historian, Ann Gilkerson has a B.A. in art history from Smith College and a Ph.D. in the history of modern architecture from Harvard University. She has taught at a variety of institutions including Tufts, Oberlin, the University of California at Davis and Harvard. Gilkerson has also been a researcher at the National Gallery of Art, where she was assistant editor, with Craig Hugh Smyth, editor, of  Michelangelo Drawings, Studies in the History of Art, The National Gallery of Art. She has also published in Visual Resources and the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians. Currently based in Tucson, AZ, she has written several entries (forthcoming) for the Arizona section of the Archipedia, the Society of Architectural Historians online encyclopedia of American architecture. Gilkerson has also been active in historic preservation, and has worked for the Northampton and Cambridge Massachusetts Historical Commissions. An early member of the Berkeley Prize Committee, she served for five years as its first administrator.

Nicole Graycar

Nicole Graycar

Nicole Graycar is a registered architect based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  She spent two years as a Davis Scholar at the United World College of the Atlantic in Wales.  She then began her college career at Tulane University.  After transferring due to Hurricane Katrina, she completed her B.Arch at Carnegie Mellon University.    Nicole is currently employed at IDC Architects, an international firm focused on science and technology.  As a Berkeley Prize Travel Fellow, she traveled to Lesotho to work with Habitat for Humanity in 2008.

Zachary Heiden

Zachary Heiden

Zachary Heiden is Legal Director of the Maine affiliate of the ACLU and Adjunct Professor of Law at the University of Maine School of Law. He has litigated cases to defend the civil rights and civil liberties of artists, immigrants, journalists, pregnant women, prisoners, protesters, religious minorities, students, and whistleblowers.  Heiden has been recognized as “rising star” in New England Super Lawyer magazine, which called him “a hero to beer drinkers everywhere” for his challenge to censorship of alcoholic beverage label illustrations. Heiden received his A.B. from Bowdoin College (1995), his M.A. in Modern Irish and British Literature from the University of Florida (1998), and his J.D. from Boston College Law School (2002). His Master's Thesis focused on home design and the language of advertising in James Joyce's Ulysses. He is also the author of Fences and Neighbors, 17 Law and Literature 225 (2005) and Too Low a Price: Waiver and the Right to Counsel, 62 Maine Law Review 488 (2010)

Bahram Hooshyar Yousefi

Bahram Hooshyar Yousefi

Bahram Hooshyar Yousefi, Ph.D., is a Senior Lecturer in Skövde University (Sweden) which he is also a senior researcher in Knowledge and Innovation Management (KIM) group there. Bahram is mainly interested in developing a cognitive platform which supports the architectural/design process in smaller firms as a knowledge-based generative/creative discipline. The logic of the process will be based on the contribution of the design knowledge and its innovative aspects in both systematic and creative ways. His research field is based on the doctoral studies (Dr.techn: “Toward a Supporting Tool of Concept Generation in the Early Architectural Design Phase”) accomplished by him in Vienna Technical University (TU Wien, TUW) and also his background in design architecture process management and visualization.

Ocean Howell

Ocean Howell

Ocean Howell is Assistant Professor of History and Architectural History in the Clark Honors College, at the University of Oregon.  He serves as a peer reviewer for the Journal of Urban History and his own writings have appeared in the Journal of Urban History, the Journal of Planning History (forthcoming), Space and Culture, theJournal of Architectural Education, and the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians. He received his Ph.D. in Urban History from the Department of Architecture at the University of California, Berkeley. His work links the study of architecture to the history of ethnic relations and urban governance.

Rachel Kallus

Rachel Kallus

Rachel Kallus is an associate professor of architecture and town planning at the Technion, Israel Institute of Technology. She is an architect and town planner who works primarily with grassroot groups and NGOs toward social and political justice. She established and heads the Social Hub for Community and Housing at the Technion, supported by the Council for Higher Education. The Hub mediates through teaching and research between communities, architects, planners, and decision-makers on housing issues. Rachel’s academic work concentrates on the sociopolitical production of the built environment and the formation of urban culture, focusing especially on ethno-nationally contested spaces, mainly in Israel/Palestine. In her work she considers policy measures (planning) and physical manipulations (architecture) as they construct everyday life. Rachel is the author of numerous publications on socio-cultural aspects of the built environment and its production in academic journals and books. She co-edited Architecture Culture: Place, Representation, Body (Resling, 2005). Her current book project, titled: The Poetic of Place in a Global World, is based on her research, funded by the Israel Science Foundation, on the architect/planner Artur Glikson in the context of post-WWII international development. Rachael received her Doctorate from the Technion, and holds an M. Arch. from M.I.T., Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.A.  

Daniel Karlin

Daniel Karlin

Daniel Karlin earned his Bachelor’s in Molecular and Cell Biology from UC Berkeley with highest honors in 2007. After earning his degree in medicine from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, he pursued a combined Internal Medicine/Pediatrics residency at UCLA. In seeking out opportunities to interact with the underserved communities of Los Angeles and abroad, he is a proud recipient of the Albert Schweitzer Community Service Fellowship, the Fogarty International Clinical Research Scholarship, and the UniHealth Foundation Scholarship. Throughout this process, his interests have turned towards the intersection of medicine and urban design, especially in the union of integrated housing and medical services for the global underserved and similar populations.

Thomas-Bernard Kenniff

Thomas-Bernard Kenniff

Thomas-Bernard Kenniff is a professor at the School of Design, Université du Québec à Montréal.  His research work since 2004 has addressed preoccupations tied to the public realm, working out the ways in which subjectivities and relationships are transformed by the collective practice of making social space. He completed his doctorate at UCL Bartlett School of Architecture in London, England, where he is doing research on public space, design and dialogue. He received his M.Arch degree from the University of Waterloo, Canada, in 2005 and won first prize in the Berkeley Prize 2002 Competition.

Barbara Knecht

Barbara Knecht

Barbara Knecht is an architect, writer and researcher in New York and Boston. She is currently the Director of Design at the Institute for Human Centered, a Boston- based, international nonprofit organization committed to enhancing the experiences of people of all ages and abilities through excellence in design. She is also principal of Strategies For Cities, a consulting practice that uses popular education and participatory research to work with urban residents and entrepreneurs to make cities more livable. Her past work includes directing a multi-country travel/study program for university undergraduates to explore social, political and environmental aspects of urban environments. She worked for local government and with NGOs on affordable housing and community development projects in New York. She has been a contributing writer for magazines (Architecture, Architectural Record, Design Book Review and the Enterprise Quarterly) and books (Design and Feminism, Futures in Urban Housing (forthcoming)). Ms. Knecht holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of California, Berkeley and a Master of Architecture from Columbia University. She was awarded a Kinne Fellowship from Columbia University, a Loeb Fellowship at Harvard University, and received a Graham Foundation grant.

Scott Koniecko

Scott Koniecko

Scott Koniecko, A.I.A., is Principal of Scott Koniecko Architects, New York, New York.  His firm, founded in 1987, is known particularly for its residential work and art galleries throughout the United States and Europe.  The firm is committed to the principle that architecture evolves from a sensitive and heedful understanding of the settings of the daily interactions of the people that it serves…and that the application of this principle is integral to both the beauty and the dignity of the place that is ultimately created. Beyond his architectural work Scott's commitment to place extends to include serving as President of the Beatrix Farrand Society located at Garland Farm on Mount Desert Island in Maine, U.S.A.  The Society seeks to foster the art and science of horticulture and landscape design as an educational facility, with an emphasis on the life and work of Beatrix Farrand, one of the United States’ foremost landscape architects of the 20th century.  Scott graduated with a Masters of Architecture from the University of California, Berkeley in 1975 and worked for I. M. Pei and Partners for ten years before starting his own firm.

Malini Krishnankutty

Malini Krishnankutty

Malini Krishnankutty is an architect and city planner based in Mumbai, India, involved in city planning projects, architectural practice, teaching and research. She graduated from the University of California, Berkeley with a Masters in Architecture and in City Planning. She has also been active in building a discourse around sustainable architecture and planning issues in India. Currently, she is a consultant on the Development Plan for Mumbai and is also co-writing two books on contemporary Indian architecture, including one on sustainable architecture. 

 

Raymond Lifchez

Raymond Lifchez

Raymond Lifchez, Founder of the BERKELEY PRIZE and Chair of the BERKELEY PRIZE Committee, is Professor in the Department of Architecture at UC Berkeley, where he has taught undergraduate design studios and writing seminars for many years. His publications include Design for Independent Living: The Environment and Physically Disabled People (1981), Rethinking Architecture: Design Students and the Physically Disabled (1987), and The Dervish Lodge: Art, Architecture, and Sufism in Ottoman Turkey (1992).

Ian Mactavish

Ian Mactavish

Ian Mactavish is from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and graduated from Columbia University in 2008 with a Bachelor's in Urban Studies and a concentration in Architecture. He wrote his thesis on the history of Philadelphia's waterfront, highlighting the impacts mid century planning efforts, the construction of Interstate-95 and the recent advent of the casino gaming industry. During his Junior year, he lived and studied in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and traveled South America extensively. During college, Ian worked at the at the Regional Plan Association, the Earth Institute at Columbia University, and currently works for Voith & Mactavish Architects, LLP, in downtown Philadelphia. As one of the winners of the 2008 Travel Fellowship, Ian traveled to Stavanger in Norway, Rotterdam, Amsterdam, Paris, and Berlin where he compared European attempts to reclaim urban space after the catastrophic WWII bombings with American cities' attempts to reclaim space after rapid mid-century decentralization and the death of the manufacturing industry.

Christine Macy

Christine Macy

Christine Macy is Dean of the Faculty of Architecture and Planning, Dalhousie University, Canada. Her research interests include the representation of cultural identity in architecture, public spaces, civic infrastructure, and festival architecture. She practiced architecture in New York and San Francisco before establishing her partnership, Filum, with Sarah Bonnemaison in 1990, specializing in lightweight structures and public space design for festivals. Her books with Sarah Bonnemaison include Architecture and Nature: Creating the American Landscape (Routledge, 2003), Festival Architecture (Routledge, 2007), and Responsive Textile Environments (TUNS/Riverside Press, 2007). Other books include Greening the city: ecological wastewater treatment in Halifax (TUNS Press, 2000), Free Labs: Design-Build Projects from Dalhousie University (TUNS Press, 2008), and Dams (W.W. Norton, 2009).

Padma Maitland

Padma Maitland

Padma D. Maitland is a PhD candidate in the Departments of Architecture and South and Southeast Asian Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on the art and architecture of religious pilgrimage sites in South Asia and countercultural exchanges between India and California. He recently founded the architectural journal Room One Thousand and has organized several exhibitions, including The Elephant’s Eye: Artful Animals in South and Southeast Asia for BAM/PFA (Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive) in 2014.

Faiq Mari

Faiq Mari

Faiq Mari is an architect working in the field of architectural design, research, and education with a focus on architecture’s potential as a tool for social and political investigation and action. He currently teaches at Birzeit University and practices architecture in Palestine. 

Faiq recently finished a masters degree in architecture history and theory from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where he was a Fulbright scholar. His thesis investigated the relationship between Zionist colonial infrastructure expansion and Palestinian resistance in the West Bank, from an architectural standpoint. 

Faiq had graduated with distinction from the Architectural Engineering program Birzeit University, Palestine, where he subsequently worked as a teaching assistant. At Birzeit, he focused on developing Universal Design education at the Department of Architecture, led applied research on developing localized building techniques in the occupied Jordan Valley of Palestine, and collaborated with fellow faculty on a number of other projects.

John Q. McDonald

John Q. McDonald

John Q. McDonald is an astronomer and spacecraft flight engineer at the University of California, Berkeley. For two years, he was a student in writing seminars at Berkeley's Department of Architecture, and assists in reading for a current seminar there taught by Prof. Raymond Lifchez (see above). John is a landscape painter and author who has published writings that interweave memoir and the built environment.  John recently published a piece on the historical preservation of a Berkeley landmark in a recent issue of Clog magazine.

Jason Miller

Jason Miller

Jason Miller joined the University of California, Berkeley College of Environmental Design's Architecture Visual Resources Library in 2003 as a library assistant, where he stayed until 2006. After working as a sailboat rigger and then as a collections and resource librarian at Anshen and Allen Architects in San Francisco, California, he returned to UC Berkeley to lead the CED Visual Resources Center as its Director.  Jason brings a deep interest in photography and its use in documenting the built environment to work with the extensive analog and digital collections held by the College of Environmental Design.  Jason received his Master's degree in library and information science from Simmons College Graduate School of Library and Information Science in 2003. Previous to getting his degree, Jason worked in various capacities at The Evergreen State College Library, the Tufts University Archives, Harvard Law Library, and the Schlesinger Library at Harvard's Radcliffe Institute. He is a member of the Visual Resources Association and the Art Libraries Society of North America.

Anusha Narayanan

Anusha Narayanan

Anusha Narayanan graduated with B.Arch. from Shri Mata Vaishno Devi University, Jammu & Kashmir. In her second year, she jointly won the first Berkeley Prize Architectural Design Fellowship in 2008. She has previously worked with Oracle (Landscape) and CRCI (Heritage Conservation) in New Delhi as an architect, following it up with a year-long stint as a writer at Indian Architect & Builder, a 27-year old architecture and design magazine in India.

Currently she works as an Associate Editor at Kyoorius, a creative exchange involved in initiating events, conferences, awards and publications in the field of Design, Advertising and Branding in India. Architecture being her first love, she aspires to understand the relevance of Indian architecture and cultural practices in the present context, through writing.

Maire O'Neill Conrad

Maire O'Neill Conrad

Maire O'Neill Conrad is Professor of Architecture at Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana, where she has taught undergraduate and graduate level design since 1990. She has also taught at University of California, Berkeley. She is a practicing architect, licensed in California and Montana, and is a member of the Montana Board of Architects and Landscape Architects.

Her recent teaching and research has focused on haptic experience in understanding space and place. She explores how we develop our understanding of natural elements of the landscape and forces of local climate, and the ways in which our built environment influences the development of this knowledge. This investigation probes the perception of place historically. She examines the social, economic, environmental and technological forces which have influenced historic building and settlement practices, and what that reflects about shifting cultural values and priorities. As a member of the Vernacular Architecture Forum and the Montana Committee for the Humanities Speakers Bureau she has presented her on-going research on the morphology of historic agricultural structures in the Rocky Mountain West.

Through exploratory foreign studies programs with her students in rural Asia (Thailand, Nepal, and India), she practices a cultural immersion learning experience, challenging students’ powers of observation and integration of design knowledge. With her students she has developed design drawings for community service projects such as an international cultural learning center for His Holiness the Dalai Lama in Darjeeling, India (Manjushree Centre for Tibetan Culture), and a paleontology Museum in Ulaan Bataar, Mongolia (Institute for the Study of Mongolian Dinosaurs), and has made community design contributions in Kathmandu, Nepal.

Phillip Ong

Phillip Ong

Phillip Ong is trained as an architect and works as a developer of commercial real estate in urban communities in Los Angeles. Working across a wide range of product types including mix-use residential, hospitality, and various scales of street retail; he’s interested in the intersection of the ideals of architecture contextualized in the messiness of urban development.  Phillip studied architecture at U.C. Berkeley and Harvard University, and is 1st Vice President of Development at Los Angeles based development company, CIM Group.

Elaine Ostroff

Elaine Ostroff

Elaine Ostroff, Hon. AIA, co-founded Boston-based Adaptive Environments in 1978. In 1989 she developed the Universal Design Education Project (UDEP) at Adaptive Environments. UDEP was a national project with design educators that has become an international model for infusing universal design in professional curriculum. She coined the term “user/expert” in 1995 to identify the individuals whose personal experiences give them unique critical capacity to evaluate environments. In 1998, she convened the Global Universal Design Education Network and its Online Newsletter. She stepped down as Executive Director in 1998 and now works as a consultant with the Institute for Human Centered Design/Adaptive Environments. There she directs the Access to Design Professions Project, with funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Access to Design Professions encourages people with disabilities to enter the design professions as a way to improve the practice of universal design.
 
The U.S. Association on Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD) honored her with their 2007 Achievement award.  In 2006, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) awarded her an Honorary Member designation. In addition, she is the 2004 recipient of the British-based, international Misha Black Medal for Distinguished Services in Design Education – the first woman and the first American to receive that award. In 2003 Ostroff was awarded the (United States) Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture Honorary Award. Ostroff was the Senior Editor of the Universal Design Handbook published by McGraw-Hill in 2001. She has her B.S from Brandeis University, an Ed.M from Harvard University and was a Radcliffe Institute Fellow in 1970-72.

John Parman

John Parman

John Parman is the editorial director/publications at Gensler, a global design consultancy. He is a founding editor of TraceSF, an online design journal focused on San Francisco, and an editorial adviser to the California edition, Architect's Newspaper. He also co-founded and published the award-winning quarterly, Design Book Review. Parman is a graduate in architecture of the University of California, Berkeley and Washington University.

Victor Santiago Pineda

Victor Santiago Pineda

Victor Santiago Pineda, Ph.D. is the Chancellor’s Postdoctoral Research Fellow for Academic Diversity at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Pineda's teaching, research and service focuses on promoting equitable outcomes for persons with disabilities, both at home and abroad. Dr. Pineda has taught courses on policy evaluation, community development, and international disability rights.  He has served as a Lecturer in the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of California at Berkeley, an Adjunct Professor in the Comparative Disability Policy Program at American University’s School for International Service, and as the Senior Research Fellow at the World Institute on Disability.

He has worked with the U.S. Department of the Treasury, World Bank, United Nations, UNESCO, UNICEF, and National Advisory Committees.  Since 2003, Dr. Pineda has headed the World Enabled Initiative, a global research and educational initiative focused on improving employment and participation outcomes for youth with disabilities. He is also a founding member of the National Disability History Consortium and is the principal researcher on the It’s Our Story: Oral History Project.

Dr. Pineda holds a Ph.D. from the Luskin School for Public Affairs at the University of California, Los Angeles and a Master’s in City and Regional Planning, a BA in Political Economy, and a BS in Business Administration from the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of “The Capability Model of Disability: Assessing the Success of UAE Federal Law No. 29 of 2006 in the Emirate of Dubai” and “It’s About Ability: An explanation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.” He was the recipient of a National Science Foundation (NSF) innovative research grant, a Fulbright-Hays Fellowship, the Thomas Jefferson Award, the Tom Clausen Fellowship for Business and Policy, and the AAPD Paul G. Hearne Leadership Award.

Helaine Kaplan Prentice

Helaine Kaplan Prentice

Helaine Kaplan Prentice, ASLA, is a lecturer at the College of Environmental Design, University of California, Berkeley, and fittingly, a Faculty Affiliate at the Center for Community Innovation. Long a planner in Oakland, Helaine’s work there was recognized with a lifetime achievement award from the Oakland Heritage Alliance. AIA’s East Bay Chapter singled out her positive impact on local projects in their first award to a non-architect. A UC Berkeley Mellon Fellow (2003-04) and juror for the Undergraduate Research Prize (2006), she currently serves on the Chancellor’s Design Review Committee for major buildings on campus, bringing expertise in resource stewardship. She holds degrees from the University of Pennsylvania and Harvard's Graduate School of Design.

Foremost a writer, Helaine explores the robust edge condition where verbal and visual overlap––hence narrative commissions from major design firms, a landscape literature initiative, and her popular class Power of the Word: Verbal Skills for Visual Thinkers. Books include Rehab Right, winner of the Gordon Gray Award from the National Trust for Historic Preservation, The Gardens of Southern California and Suzhou: Shaping an Ancient City for the New China. Articles in Landscape Architecture Magazine include profiles of cultural geographer J.B. Jackson and Christo’s luminous Running Fence, for which she took her own air photos. The ASLA honored her writing with the distinguished Bradford Williams Medal.

Adriano Pupilli

Adriano Pupilli

Adriano Pupilli is a Sydney-based architect and public artist working at the intersection of architecture and art, ethics and environment. Through his built and exhibited works Adriano explores creative new ways to engage with residents to co-produce built environments that sustain people and place.  Adriano has worked in a diverse range contexts exhibiting at venues including: Peri(pheral)scopes - Laneway Art Programme City of Sydney, Cardboard House - Houses of the Future Exhibition Sydney Opera House Forecourt, Paperhouse - Tin Sheds Gallery University of Sydney, Sustaining Shelter - ChangeX Redfern, [re]Appropriate - U.C. Berkeley Sather Gate USA and Global Studio - Istanbul Turkey.

In between independent projects, Adriano collaborates with not-for-profit Healthabitat (2011 UN World Habitat Award winner) on community-led development initiatives, including Fixing Houses for Better Health - a nation-wide indigenous housing improvement programme, and Bhattedande Sanitation Upgrade Project - a locally managed bio-gas lavatory project for Tibetan migrants on the outskirts of Katmandu Nepal. Other collaborations include Massimiliano Fuksas Rome, Stalker Rome and Peter Stutchbury Sydney.

Clare Robinson

Clare Robinson

Clare Robinson is an Assistant Professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Arizona. Her recent work focuses on the architecture of social environments on postwar college campuses as well as the problems and complexities surrounding representation, spatiality, and places of memory. Her approach to teaching and research reflect a broad range of interests that cover topics in institutional architecture, leisure environments, and regional planning. Clare received her M.Arch. from Harvard University Graduate School of Design and Ph.D. in Architecture from the University of California at Berkeley and is the recipient of several awards and grants, including a Graham Foundation Grant, Bancroft Fellowship, and the James and Sylvia Thayer Research Fellowship.

Patty Rose

Patty Rose

Patty Rose is the Executive Director of Greenspace, NCR. Patty considers herself an architect of experiences and a trailblazer in the fields of sustainability and design for public service. In pursuit of the creation of partnerships that result in sustainable real estate, economic and community development, one of her current projects is designing and managing the District’s Smarter DC Challenge program that engages organizations and buildings in greening their operations and facilities. Her leadership efforts contributed to creating and passing the DC Green Building Act in 2006 and its successful implementation as a mayoral appointee to the DC Green Building Advisory Council for eight years. Patty has also served as the Executive Director’s Special Assistant for the St. Louis, Missouri’s regional transportation and development agency, as the Assistant Director for an experimental College of Design, Art and Architecture in Santa Monica, CA and as the co-founder of Mindsai, a Seattle-based multi-media edutainment production company. Patty holds a BA in architecture from the University of California at Berkeley.

Daves Rossell

Daves Rossell

Daves Rossell teaches American architecture and urbanism, vernacular architecture and cultural landscape as Professor of Architectural History at the Savannah College of Art and Design. Rossell received his B.A. and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley.  His research interests range from field study of the built environment of Savannah and its surrounding lowcountry to exploration in the history of technology, as well as appreciating cross-cultural comparisons of material culture.

Rossell is co-editor of Commemoration in America: Essays on Monuments, Memorialization, and Memory (2013) and is a co-author of the soon-to-be-published Savannah guidebook put out by the University of Virginia Press for the Society of Architectural Historians.

David Salazar

David Salazar

David Salazar has been a committee member of the BERKELEY PRIZE since 1999 and leads DTSalazar Inc., a multi-disciplinary Owner's Representation, Development and Design firm in San Francisco and New York.   

David Salazar conducted his architectural training at UC Berkeley and London's Architectural Association.  He also holds Master degrees from Harvard University and Columbia University in Management and Real Estate alongside having been a member of Zaha Hadid Architects in London, and Hines Interests executive office in New York City.

 

Magdalena Saura

Magdalena Saura

Magdalena Saura is an architect, art historian and professor of architecture at the Universitat Polytecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain. Dr. Saura advises the Officer of Cultural Affairs of Catalonia on social and historic preservation policies; has led the master planning team for the Greco-Roman archeological site of Empuries, Spain; and built a promenade for the Barcelona 1992 Olympic Games. Her publications include articles on thePalau de la Musica in Barcelona and also on Leon Battista Alberti, as well as Pobles Catalans/Catalan Villages (Barcelona, 1997).

Corey Schnobrich

Corey Schnobrich

Corey Schnobrich works at the architecture and planning firm of Bohlin Cywinski Jackson in San Francisco and teaches part time at the Academy of Art University. In 2012 he graduated with a Masters in Science of Architecture from the University of California, Berkeley, where his research focused on environment and behavior from the scale of furniture to urban public space.

Anthony Schuman

Anthony Schuman

Anthony Schuman is a past president of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA), is Associate Professor of Architecture at the New Jersey Institute of Architecture. A registered architect, his articles on housing design and community development appear in eight books and numerous journals. He has been a founding member of several advocacy and activist organizations in architecture and planning.

Arijit Sen

Arijit Sen

Dr. Arijit Sen is an architect and vernacular architecture historian who writes, teaches and studies urban cultural landscapes. His research includes studies of South Asian immigrant landscapes in Northern California, New York, and Chicago.  He has worked on post disaster reconstruction and community-based design in the Lower Ninth Ward, New Orleans and directed public history and cultural landscapes field schools in Milwaukee. Sen’s academic and research background is in architectural history, social, cultural and behavioral analysis of the built environment, and American cultural landscape studies.

Currently an Associate Professor of Architecture at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee with an honorary appointment with the Department of Art History at the University of Wisconsin Madison, Dr. Sen cofounded the multi campus Buildings-Landscapes-Cultures area of doctoral research. He has served as a fellow at various humanities centers such as the Center for 21st Century Studies, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and Center for Advanced Study, University of Minnesota. His grants include a Graham Foundation grant for his book project, a Research Grant Initiative award to study immigrant cultural landscapes, and two Wisconsin Humanities Council major grants for an architectural field school. In 2013 he received the American Association for State and Local History 2013 Award of Merit for that field school. Sen has coedited Landscapes of Mobility: Culture, Politics and Placemaking (Ashgate Publishers, UK, 2013, Jennifer Johung coeditor) and Making Place: Space and Embodiment in the City (Indiana University Press, 2014, Lisa Silverman coeditor).

 

 

 

Murray Silverstein

Murray Silverstein

Murray Silverstein is a partner in the architectural firm of Jacobson Silverstein Winslow/Degenhardt, Berkeley, California. He is co-author of four books on architecture, including A Pattern Language (Oxford University Press) and Patterns of Home (The Taunton Press), and has recently published a volume of poetry, Any Old Wolf (Sixteen Rivers Press, 2006).

Avikal Somvanshi

Avikal Somvanshi

Avikal Somvanshi is a Fulbright-Nehru Fellow at the Center for Urban Science and Progress of the New York University furthering his studies. He earlier worked in the capacity of Programme Officer for the Sustainable Buildings and Habitat Programme at the Centre for Science and Environment, a New Delhi based environmental think tank. He has co-authored "Building Sense: Beyond the green facade of sustainable habitat," an exhaustive critique of practices, policies and politics governing the greening of building sector and urban habitat in India. He has served as member at multiple national and international committees on sustainable design and habitat issues including Bureau of Indian Standards. He has given lectures at UN-Habitat (Nepal) and University of Delhi. He is a frequent contributor to and commentator in Indian and international news media, including The Hindu, Times of India, Business Standard, MO*, Quartz and Die Zeit. He has previously worked in capacity of architect with Earthauz, an alternative architectural practice based out of Auroville in sourthern India and HCP Design and Project Management Ltd, a design firm based out of Ahmedabad in western India.

 

Avikal was a 2008 Winner of the Architectural Design Fellowship.

Preeti Talwai

Preeti Talwai

Preeti Talwai is a User Experience Researcher at X, the innovation lab of Google. In this role, I conduct qualitative human-centered research that helps vet futuristic ideas and determine which are worth pursuing. I study human needs, attitudes, motivations, and behaviors across different domains and ecosystems.  She completed a master's degree in Environmental Design at the Yale School of Architecture, where her interdisciplinary research studied public space and social identities. She holds degrees in Architecture,  History of the Built Environment and Sustainable Design from UC Berkeley (B.A., 2013), where her work was recognized by the Library Prize for Undergraduate Research, the Kathryn Wayne Book Award, and the College of Environmental Design's Thesis Prize.  In 2011, she was one of nine finalists for the Berkeley Prize essay competition and was awarded its Design Fellowship, with which she created and launched a student design competition in the Bay Area. 

Philip Tidwell

Philip Tidwell

 

Philip Tidwell is an architect and educator based in Helsinki, Finland. After studying in the United States, he received a Fulbright fellowship to Finland and then worked as an architect in the office of Juhani Pallasmaa.

His work and research focus on the intersection of climate, culture and materials in architectural design. Since 2011, he has taught primarily at Aalto University where he works with students from Finland and around the world. His studios emphasize a direct engagement with materials as well as a holistic understanding of the way that architecture forms and is informed by trajectories in ecology, energy and social behavior.

In addition to teaching, Philip operates an independent design studio, Peripheral Projects, which has designed award-winning exhibitions for the Museum of Finnish Architecture, the Seoul Museum of Art, and the Nordic Pavilion of the Venice Biennale.

 In 2003 he was awarded the BERKELEY PRIZE for his essay, "Place, Memory and the Problem of the Architectural Image."

Robert Ungar

Robert Ungar

Robert Ungar is a teaching at the Department of Architecture in Bezalel Academy, Jerusalem, Israel, and co-founded ONYA collective in 2014. ONYA collective is an independent group of architects, designers and activists in the fields of community-oriented design and ecology. They are working with municipalities and NGOs to develop urban interventions that bring elements of nature to communities, mostly in the impoverished south of Tel-Aviv. Outside Israel, the group took part in projects by architectural institutes or art museums from New York, Warsaw and Ljubljana. As an active architect, Robert is involved in urban design projects focusing on the public domain.

Robert is the winner of the BERKELEY PRIZE Architectural Design Fellowship in 2010 and a finalist in the BERKELEY PRIZE essay competition in 2009.

 

 

Leslie Van Duzer

Leslie Van Duzer

Leslie Van Duzer is a Professor of Architecture at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. She has taught in over a dozen schools of architecture in the United States, Canada and Europe. Prof. Van Duzer has published three books in collaboration with Kent Kleinman: Villa Muller: A Work of Adolf LoosRudolf Arnheim: Revealing Vision, and Mies van der Rohe: The Krefeld Villas and one in collaboration with Maria Swadkowska: Adolf Loos: Works in the Czech Lands. In 2014, she sole-authored the first book, House Shumiatcher, in a series she initiated on endangered West Coast Modern houses. She is currently undertaking two new books: The Art of Deception and The Village Movement.

Jan Wampler

Jan Wampler

Jan Wampler, FAIA, is a Professor of Architecture at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architecture (Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA).  Each semester, he teaches an Architectural Design Studio and a special academic initiative, the "International Workshop".  One of the current results of this effort is10,000 Architects, a course for young people around the world coordinated with United Nations Habitat.  In addition to teaching, Jan Wampler runs an architectural office from his home town of Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts.  His recent projects include the Renaissance ProjectHope for Haiti, a public effort to establish a vital, self-sustaining resource for Port au-Prince, including housing for 1,000 people; redesign of an area in Havana, Cuba; two new cities in Jinan, China; urban design in Tangshan, China; and buildings in several Chinese cities.  Recently, a well-known architectural critic published a glowing review of an exhibition of Jan Wampler’s work, calling him "The Walt Whitman of Architects".

Jan has been a Visiting Professor at several Universities around the world including the University of California, Berkeley (USA); University of Sydney (Australia); University of South Florida (Tampa, USA); and in Tsinghua, China.   His articles and buildings have been published in a number of international architectural magazines.  He also authored a landmark book: All Their Own, People and the Places They Build, which focuses on "architecture….based on the desires of people."  Jan has been honored with the Distinguished Professor Award from the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (USA).   He received his Bachelor of Science in Architecture at the Rhode Island School of Design (Providence, Rhode Island, USA) in 1963, and a Masters of Architecture and Urban Design from the Harvard Graduate School of Design (Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA) in 1964. 

Matt Werner

Matt Werner

Matt Werner was born in Oakland, California and grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area. He received his BA in English from UC Berkeley, graduating Phi Beta Kappa with Highest Honors. Werner interned and volunteered at McSweeney's Publishing for five years. Werner earned a Master's in Literature and Modernity from the University of Edinburgh. Since March 2010, Werner has worked as a technical writer at Google.

His writing for Google has been translated into 40 languages and quoted in dozens of publications, including The Wall Street Journal. Outside of Google, Werner writes on music, culture, and local history for Oakland Local and a variety of Oakland blogs. He is the author of Papers for Suppression of Reality (2011), Oakland in Popular Memory (2012), and Bay Area Underground (2013). Outside of writing, Werner volunteers with the health nonprofit Microclinic International.

Cynthia Whitehead

Cynthia Whitehead

Cynthia Whitehead is an international environmental lawyer whose work integrates environmental, land use, administrative law, and human rights. She began in the 1970s with the The Conservation Foundation, Washington, D.C., researching "what Europe does better" in land use planning, urban development, and public participation. Since 1981 she works as a consultant to the European Union on the reform of urban planning and environmental laws and practices in Europe and Asia, in particular in the formerly Communist countries. She is a graduate of Reed College and the University of Oregon, and the recipient of a Fulbright-Hayes fellowship to the University of Cologne and a German Academic Exchange fellowship to the University of Munster.

Keith Wilson

Keith Wilson

Keith Wilson, Principal, Seaton/Wilson Architects, received his BA and MArch from UC Berkeley and was an Adjunct Professor of Architecture at the California College of the Arts. After twenty years of architecture, he has left active practice and is concentrating on watercolors inspired by vernacular structures, public spaces and the social organizations that shape the built environment. Extensive travel that began with the UC Branner Traveling Fellowship has shaped his understanding and appreciation of the buildings and cultures of the world.

Friedner Wittman

Friedner Wittman

Friedner Wittman, Ph.D., has over thirty years' experience in community planning for health and social services, environmental design, and architectural programming. His primary interests are twofold: environmental approaches to prevention planning for community-level problems of alcohol/drug availability; and policies, practices, and design of facilities and settings for alcohol/other drug treatment and recovery services, and for treatment of mental health disabilities. From 1988 through 2011, he founded and directed the Community Prevention Planning Program, now part of the Institute for Study of Societal Issues, University of California, Berkeley. The Community Prevention Planning Program is a nationally-recognized program that utilizes environmental planning approaches to prevent problems related to the retail, public, and social availability of alcoholic beverages, tobacco, and other drugs.

Dr. Wittman has worked extensively in the United States with California state agencies (especially Department of Alcohol and Drug Programs), the National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse, the national Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, and numerous counties and cities on problems related to local alcohol and drug availability. Dr. Wittman has written over 100 papers, reports, monographs, and published articles. His education includes a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley College of Environmental Design (1983); an M. Arch. from the University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Fine Arts in Philadelphia (1967); and a B.A. in Philosophy from Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pennsylvania (1964). Dr. Wittman and his wife Ruth Henderson Wittman reside in Berkeley, California. They have two children.

 


Emeritus Committee Members

Stanford Anderson
Thomas A. Dutton
Roberta Feldman
Lance Hosey
Michael Keniger
Keith Mitnick
Angela Nkya (deceased)
Hadas Rix
Rafi Segal

 

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